Response to Intervention (RtI)

  • What is RTI??

    Overview

    Response to Intervention (RtI) is the practice of providing high-quality instruction and interventions matched to student need, monitoring progress frequently to make decisions about changes in instruction or goals, and applying child's response data to important educational decisions.  RtI should be used for decisions about education, creating a well-integrated system of instruction/intervention guided by child outcome data. 

    Through the use of the RtI process, South Allegheny strives to make all children proficient.  The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) mandates that all children make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), and the RtI process can be utilized to address the challenges and pitfalls of NCLB for improving outcomes for all students. 

     

    Core Principles of RtI

    • We can effectively teach all children
    • Intervene early and effectively
    • Use a 3-tier model of service delivery
    • Use research-based, scientifically validated intervention(s)/instruction to the extent available
    • Monitor student progress to inform instruction
    • Use data to make decisions
    • Use assessments for three different purposes: (1) screening applied to all children to identify those who are not making progress at expected rates; (2) diagnostics to determine what children can and cannot do in important academic domains; and (3) progress monitoring to determine if academic interventions are producing desired results

     

    RTI Model

    RtI Model: A Problem Solving Process

    Tier 1:

    Tier 1 is quality classroom instruction for all students.  In Tier 1, the classroom teacher will be providing all interventions.  Interventions can consist of double dosing reading, small group instruction, Read Naturally probes, math manipulatives, etc.  For instance, if students are experiencing difficulty with reading fluency and comprehension, then the teacher will use at least two classroom interventions to help excel that student's reading. 

     

    Tier 2:

    Tier 2 will consist of approximately 15% of the student population.  In Tier 2, the classroom teacher and intervention specialist such as Title staff will be providing supplemental instruction.  Interventions may be similar to Tier 1; however, the duration and frequency will now increase during Tier 2.  The supplemental instruction will be 3 days out of the 6 day cycle. 

     

    Tier 3:

    Tier 3 will consist of approximately 5% of the student population.  In Tier 3, the classroom teacher and intervention specialist will be providing intensive instruction with the intervention programs.  Interventions may be similar to Tier 2; however the duration, ferquency, and intensity will now increase during Tier 3.  The intensive instruction will be 5 days out of the 6 day cycle. 

     

     

    Tier 1:

    1. Person responsible for interventions: Classroom Teacher                                                                 
    2. Progress Monitoring: Regularly scheduled Curriculum Based Assessments and Universal Screening such as DIBELS or Scantron

    Tier 2:

    1. Person responsible for interventions: Intervention Specialist --> RtI Teacher. 
    2. Progress Monitoring: Every other week
    3. Duration and frequency of intervention: 3 days out of 6 day cycle
    4. Teacher to Student Ratio: 1:10
    5. Location of Intervention: Pull Out

    Tier 3:

    1. Person responsible for interventions: Intervention Specialist --> RtI Teacher
    2. Progress Monitoring: Once a week
    3. Duration and frequency of intervention: 5 days out of 6 day cycle
    4. Teacher to Student Ratio: 1:5
    5. Location of Intervention: Pull Out

     

    RTI Myths and Facts

    Myths About RTI

     

    Myth #1:  The outcome and intent of RTI is identification.

    There are two goals of RTI.  The first is to deliver evidenced based interventions and instructions for all students.  The second is to use a student’s response to an intervention as a basis for determining further instructional needs.

     

    Myth #2:  Tier 3 is only special education.

    The last tier in the RTI model represents the most intense level of intervention, which may or may not include special education services. 

     

    Myth #3:  The main benefit of RTI is to identify those students who are not really learning disabled, but simply not achieving due to other reasons.

    The main benefit of RTI is prevention! Data collected during the RTI process can be used as one source of information, but identification is an end-product of RTI, not the primary purpose. 

     

    Myth #4:  The research on RTI is solely based on beginning reading/math skills.

    Most of the research on RTI focuses on beginning skills.  However, just as much research (if not more) has been produced on the use of a problem-solving model in treating behavioral problems in all ages.

     

    Myth #5:  RTI is short term.

    There is no formula for how long any intervention should last, especially if the student is making progress.